RIFE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

RESULTS USING VOLTAGE SQUARE WAVES

(Semi-technical. Links for other articles below and

non-technical explanation)

by Gary Wade, 11/14/00

Applying a voltage square wave (see Figure 1) to the bare skin using two electrodes see Figure 2) means one electrode is at a relative positive voltage and the other is at a relative negative voltage and periodically the two electrodes switch polarity back an forth. Several things happen to the tissue, which is exposed to a voltage square wave.

1) During the polarity switch sonic pings of very short time duration (submicrosecond) are generated in the dead skin layer (see Figure 3. These sonic pings have very high frequency ultrasound components associated with them and by adjusting the ping rates (adjusting square wave frequency) a particular ultrasound frequency can be enhanced which will destroy a particular microbe.

2) During polarity switch the charged salt ions of your body fluid reorganize their positions and concentrations just under the dead skin layer adjacent to the electrode. This reorganization process generates charge density waves of the various ion types present and these charge density waves travel away from the skin surface into the body.(1) A charge density wave is a moving ion concentration excess or depletion of an ion type. These charge density waves are effectively traveling excess net charge and therefore have an electric field which interacts with charged structures such as the dipole charge layers on all of your body cell membranes. As these charge density waves pass through your body they vibrate all of your cell membranes and produce broad band ultrasound which can destroy microbes (see Figure 4).

Furthermore, if the electric field associated with the charge density wave is strong enough, it can alter the structure of delicate proteins on the surfaces of virus capsid coats. These proteins are essential for the virus to attach itself to its target cells. If the shape of the protein is significantly changed by the charge density wave, the virus can not attach to its target cell type and is effectively dead. Furthermore, bacteria have delicate protein structures on their surface and extended into their environment by molecular tubules and fibers. These proteins / enzymes are essential for bacterial functions and can be damaged easily by charge density wave electric fields. These charge density waves can also be used to deactivate most snake venom, which are in general delicate protein structures.(2)

3) The electric current flowing in the tissue from the applied electrode voltage has an electric field associated with it. This electric field places a force on charged particles and charged structures in the tissue. Since this electric field changes its direction periodically (voltage square wave), it generates periodic forces on charged particles and charged structures in the tissues. The detailed calculations are complex, however the end result is that pressure square waves are generated. These pressure square waves have hidden in them a spectrum of periodic mechanical vibration (see Figure 5 ). As can be seen in Figure 5 the frequencies of mechanical vibration generated are odd multiples (1,3,5,7, ) of the voltage square wave frequency. Figures 5B, C, and D illustrate the first three hidden sine wave components. Figure 5E illustrates these three components added together showing how quickly the hidden components converge to a square wave. So, if one of these frequency components is of strong enough intensity and closely matches the one of the lethal ultrasound frequencies of a particular microbe, it can be destroyed. It should also be pointed out that mechanical vibration which are odd fractional sub harmonics of a fundamental lethal frequency (1/3, 1/5, 1/7, ) can also kill the microbe if the intensity is high enough. RifeTech@Fastmail.fm

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References:

1) See Appendices on Resources page.

2) High Voltage Shock Treatment For Snake Bite, The Lancet, July 26, 1986, page 229.

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